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“So, suppose knowledge is not the goal of education. Rather, suppose today’s content knowledge is an offshoot of successful ongoing learning in a changing world – in which ‘learning’ means ‘learning to perform in the world.’ ” Grant Wiggins

Granted, and...

UPDATE: Cool. This post was nominated and made the shortlist for Most Influential Post of 2012 by edublog. I’m really honored!

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What if the earth moves and the sun is at rest? What if gravity is just a special case of space-time? Following both counter-intuitive premises revolutionized science and ushered in the modern world. Could a similar counter-intuitive thought experiment advance education from where I believe we are currently stuck? I believe so.

The educational thought experiment I wish to undertake concerns curriculum. Not the specific content of curriculum, but the idea of curriculum, what any curriculum is, regardless of subject. Like Copernicus, I propose that for the sake of better results we need to turn conventional wisdom on it is head:  let’s see what results if we think of action, not knowledge, as the essence of an education; let’s see what results from thinking of future ability, not knowledge…

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About J Martens

Educator living and working in Vancouver BC Learning how formative assessment, literacy, inquiry, and technology serve to improve learning and increase engagement (for teachers & students).
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One Response to Previous Post

  1. Larry Purss says:

    This comment,
    suppose today’s content knowledge is an offshoot of successful ongoing learning in a changing world – in which ‘learning’ means ‘learning to perform in the world.’
    expresses a deep truth about learning as something that is *mediated* IN the world, not somethinh that happens inside our minds. If we are learning to perform then we need to be *shown* HOW to perform which becomes a central question.
    The answer becomes *we learn* through *leading activities* and learning therefore LEADS development.
    THIS *way* of understanding *learning* expresses a certain tradition as explored by Dewey, Mead, Vygotsky, and Stuart Shankir.
    Continental philosophy points to *playing* or *dancing* or *singing* the world. These metaphors capture the truth of *expressing* or *performing* the world.
    THIS *way* of knowing is transformative and expands our notions of *learning* and bridges learning & development as central tasks of education as *expression.

    Larry

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